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Catalog:

The Slippery Performance of Domesticity

Opened June 25th, 2021 View 3D Gallery
Poster image for The Slippery Performance of Domesticity

Statement:

Our roots are within ourselves. We must ask ourselves whether we are the branches of other boughs and roots, or whether we are their seeds, granted with the potency to make our own roots.

Roots run deep, some roots find detours into fungi. It shouldn’t be precluded that perhaps, we are the fungi of larger plants, maybe even larger ecosystems. Although with all parasitic relationships, we should also be aware of how the interplay between host and parasites are symbiotic, impossible to entangle. That is to suggest, homes too can be the parasites - that we love them even if they may eventually drain us fully.

Text by Fraser Hanley-Nicholls and Bart Seng Wen Long

Room Curators
Anna Nazo
Bart Seng Wen Long
Danielle Anderson

Participating Artists:
James Thomson
Bart Seng Wen Long
Danielle Anderson
Fraser Hanley-Nicholls
Gabrielle Jin
Lauren Hillsdon
Rivkah Mitchell-Dhillon
Danielle Anderson
Yura Kim
Fraser Hanley-Nicholls
Hayley Richardson
Owen Bennett
Katy Philpot
Shiliang Hu

Artworks in this room:

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

James Thomson

Make Yourself Uncomfortable can be viewed as a proposed alternative to normative ways of thinking about our living spaces, and how we might change the interactions we have with our surroundings to affect real change in our lives. It is primarily to be seen as a participatory act which encourages interaction and conversation with the subject matter in the photographs. It is through this, that we might be able to discuss the benefits of an art practice to someone on an individual level. The central concept of the work engages with ideas of function in comparison and contradiction to dysfunction of the home object.

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

Janes Thomson

Make Yourself Uncomfortable can be viewed as a proposed alternative to normative ways of thinking about our living spaces, and how we might change the interactions we have with our surroundings to affect real change in our lives. It is primarily to be seen as a participatory act which encourages interaction and conversation with the subject matter in the photographs. It is through this, that we might be able to discuss the benefits of an art practice to someone on an individual level. The central concept of the work engages with ideas of function in comparison and contradiction to dysfunction of the home object.

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

James Thomson

Make Yourself Uncomfortable can be viewed as a proposed alternative to normative ways of thinking about our living spaces, and how we might change the interactions we have with our surroundings to affect real change in our lives. It is primarily to be seen as a participatory act which encourages interaction and conversation with the subject matter in the photographs. It is through this, that we might be able to discuss the benefits of an art practice to someone on an individual level. The central concept of the work engages with ideas of function in comparison and contradiction to dysfunction of the home object.

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Chronic Violence

Gabrielle Gin

'Chronic Violence' is a photographic project aimed to determine how consumerism has affected society. Consumerism encourages people to reveal their social class through over-consumption. In China, consumerism-originated industries are growing fast and the side effects of consumerism are becoming significantly severe. Chronic Violence aims to raise awareness of this social phenomenon, and to turn away from consumerism to find our happiness elsewhere.

Chronic Violence

Chronic Violence

Gabrielle Gin

'Chronic Violence' is a photographic project aimed to determine how consumerism has affected society. Consumerism encourages people to reveal their social class through over-consumption. In China, consumerism-originated industries are growing fast and the side effects of consumerism are becoming significantly severe. Chronic Violence aims to raise awareness of this social phenomenon, and to turn away from consumerism to find our happiness elsewhere.

Chronic Violence

Chronic Violence

Gabrielle Gin

'Chronic Violence' is a photographic project aimed to determine how consumerism has affected society. Consumerism encourages people to reveal their social class through over-consumption. In China, consumerism-originated industries are growing fast and the side effects of consumerism are becoming significantly severe. Chronic Violence aims to raise awareness of this social phenomenon, and to turn away from consumerism to find our happiness elsewhere.

Chronic Violence

Chronic Violence

Gabrielle Gin

'Chronic Violence' is a photographic project aimed to determine how consumerism has affected society. Consumerism encourages people to reveal their social class through over-consumption. In China, consumerism-originated industries are growing fast and the side effects of consumerism are becoming significantly severe. Chronic Violence aims to raise awareness of this social phenomenon, and to turn away from consumerism to find our happiness elsewhere.

Chronic Violence

Chronic Violence

Gabrielle Gin

'Chronic Violence' is a photographic project aimed to determine how consumerism has affected society. Consumerism encourages people to reveal their social class through over-consumption. In China, consumerism-originated industries are growing fast and the side effects of consumerism are becoming significantly severe. Chronic Violence aims to raise awareness of this social phenomenon, and to turn away from consumerism to find our happiness elsewhere.

Chronic Violence

Chronic Violence

Gabrielle Gin

'Chronic Violence' is a photographic project aimed to determine how consumerism has affected society. Consumerism encourages people to reveal their social class through over-consumption. In China, consumerism-originated industries are growing fast and the side effects of consumerism are becoming significantly severe. Chronic Violence aims to raise awareness of this social phenomenon, and to turn away from consumerism to find our happiness elsewhere.

Chronic Violence

Dalkeith

Lauren Hillsdon

Dalkeith is the name of my grandparent’s house, a 1930s mid-terrace in Enfield, north London. Dalkeith is an intimate portrait of the house exploring my family’s, as well as my own, relationship with the house. By incorporating text and archival images alongside my own, the intention is to create a holistic overview that highlights the significance of this home.

Open PDF Viewer

Dalkeith

Lauren Hillsdon

Dalkeith is the name of my grandparent’s house, a 1930s mid-terrace in Enfield, north London. Dalkeith is an intimate portrait of the house exploring my family’s, as well as my own, relationship with the house. By incorporating text and archival images alongside my own, the intention is to create a holistic overview that highlights the significance of this home.

I am Pineapple

Rivkah_Mitchell-Dhillon

I am Pineapple explores the artist's mixed race identity focusing on a social and political context. Rivkah explores racism that she has faced in order to construct a series of work involving photography and moving image.

I am Pineapple

Grandmother Project

Yura Kim

Kim Yura is a South Korean photographer based in South Korea and London. Her work shows her relationship with her grandmother and deals subjectively with the issues concerning senior citizens and their challenges in Korea. Yura uses the camera to show her grandmother's situation, her dreams, and challenges. As well as a goal to have a chance to reflect on our lives

Grandmother Project

Grandmother Project

Yura Kim

Kim Yura is a South Korean photographer based in South Korea and London. Her work shows her relationship with her grandmother and deals subjectively with the issues concerning senior citizens and their challenges in Korea. Yura uses the camera to show her grandmother's situation, her dreams, and challenges. As well as a goal to have a chance to reflect on our lives

Grandmother Project

Grandmother Project

Yura Kim

Kim Yura is a South Korean photographer based in South Korea and London. Her work shows her relationship with her grandmother and deals subjectively with the issues concerning senior citizens and their challenges in Korea. Yura uses the camera to show her grandmother's situation, her dreams, and challenges. As well as a goal to have a chance to reflect on our lives

Grandmother Project

Grandmother Project

Yura Kim

Kim Yura is a South Korean photographer based in South Korea and London. Her work shows her relationship with her grandmother and deals subjectively with the issues concerning senior citizens and their challenges in Korea. Yura uses the camera to show her grandmother's situation, her dreams, and challenges. As well as a goal to have a chance to reflect on our lives

Grandmother Project

Grandmother Project

Yura Kim

Yura is a South Korean photographer based in South Korea and London. Her work shows her relationship with her grandmother and deals subjectively with the issues concerning senior citizens and their challenges in Korea. Yura uses the camera to show her grandmother's situation, her dreams, and challenges. As well as a goal to have a chance to reflect on our lives

Grandmother Project

I am Pineapple

Rivkah_Mitchell-Dhillon

I am Pineapple explores the artist's mixed race identity focusing on a social and political context. Rivkah explores racism that she has faced in order to construct a series of work involving photography and moving image.

Closer Together

Leila Richards

‘Closer Together’ provides an insight in to one household’s experience through the second half of the pandemic. In a time where so many creatives struggled to stay inspired and active, I turned to the closest people I had. They acted as my muses in this unknown environment.

Grandmother Project

Yura Kim

Kim Yura is a South Korean photographer based in South Korea and London. Her work shows her relationship with her grandmother and deals subjectively with the issues concerning senior citizens and their challenges in Korea. Yura uses the camera to show her grandmother's situation, her dreams, and challenges. As well as a goal to have a chance to reflect on our lives

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up 2021

Bart Seng Wen Long

人在江湖 身不由己

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Troubled Peace

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Troubled Peace

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Troubled Peace

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Troubled Peace

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Troubled Peace

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Dalkeith

Lauren Hillsdon

Dalkeith is the name of my grandparent’s house, a 1930s mid-terrace in Enfield, north London. Dalkeith is an intimate portrait of the house exploring my family’s, as well as my own, relationship with the house. By incorporating text and archival images alongside my own, the intention is to create a holistic overview that highlights the significance of this home.

Dalkeith

Antidea

Sofia Leppan Aboli

Antidea is a collection of images brought together by various underlying themes, specifically studying the aesthetics and costume design of TV Shows; Queens Gambit & Mad Men. The coffee table book highlights the injustices women faced/still face in the workplace.

Open PDF Viewer

Antidea

Sophia Leppan Aboli

Antidea is a collection of images brought together by various underlying themes, specifically studying the aesthetics and costume design of TV Shows; Queens Gambit & Mad Men. The coffee table book highlights the injustices women faced/still face in the workplace.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Bart Seng Wen Long

Dealing specifically with notions of fetishisation and self-fetishisation within an East-Asian context and the anime medium, this project investigates from oblique angles how fetishistic signs of a contemporary, postmodern iteration of East-Asiatic Orientalism is reproduced, wilfully inscribed and awkwardly consumed. The work centers and insists affectionately on the real agency of the fetish, and from there, allows for disruptions within the ossified structures of contemporary racial Othering as well as the coercive discourses around it. What seems significant to my position is the interplay between fetishes and fetishists, and how power dynamics oscillate, bringing with it shades of complicity and interdependence. By employing techniques like humour, juxtaposition, myth-making and satire, I hope to challenge the limited expectations of fetishistic signifiers, to refuse any one interpretation from becoming racialised gospel, and to immerse viewers in the unpredictable agency of the Ornamental fetish (in reference to Anne Anlin Cheng's theory of Ornamentalism), and its multivalent relations with wider realities of labour, capital, desiring, contemporary media genres and gender issues. ‘May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up’ includes still images and video installations. Its visual language is informed by and hopes to subvert popular cultural media. It begins when the fantasy of fetishism does not complete but slips into the indeterminate domain of the uncanny.

May The Real Ornament Please Stand Up

Dirty Dinners

Katy Philpot

Katy Philpot reflects upon her love of family dinners through an exploration of food content in an alternative way. Her aesthetic combines beauty and grotesque through an aggression to challenge the way in which we view art, often causing feelings of intrigue, satisfaction and disgust.

Dirty Dinners

Dirty Dinners

Katy Philpot

Katy Philpot reflects upon her love of family dinners through an exploration of food content in an alternative way. Her aesthetic combines beauty and grotesque through an aggression to challenge the way in which we view art, often causing feelings of intrigue, satisfaction and disgust.

Dirty Dinners

Dirty Dinners

Katy Philpot

Katy Philpot reflects upon her love of family dinners through an exploration of food content in an alternative way. Her aesthetic combines beauty and grotesque through an aggression to challenge the way in which we view art, often causing feelings of intrigue, satisfaction and disgust.

Dirty Dinners

Dirty Dinners

Katy Philpot reflects upon her love of family dinners through an exploration of food content in an alternative way. Her aesthetic combines beauty and grotesque through an aggression to challenge the way in which we view art, often causing feelings of intrigue, satisfaction and disgust.
Dirty Dinners

Gods of Care

Owen Bennett

Owen Bennett is exploring the fundamental essence of caring relationships and the themes of interdependence, reliance, and sacrifice. Care is a concept that has surrounded him and his family since the birth of his younger brother. Oscar was born with severe cerebral palsy and as a result, his family home has been a hub of caring activity ever since. The image subject depicts Oscar with Sian, who has been his carer for almost 10 years now, portraying their connection as well as their physicality. This image posits an introspective mindset within the viewer, questioning their notions of care, giving and receiving, entitlement and love.

Gods of Care

Gods of Care

Owen Bennett

Owen Bennett is exploring the fundamental essence of caring relationships and the themes of interdependence, reliance, and sacrifice. Care is a concept that has surrounded him and his family since the birth of his younger brother. Oscar was born with severe cerebral palsy and as a result, his family home has been a hub of caring activity ever since. The image subject depicts Oscar with Sian, who has been his carer for almost 10 years now, portraying their connection as well as their physicality. This image posits an introspective mindset within the viewer, questioning their notions of care, giving and receiving, entitlement and love.

Gods of Care

Gods of Care

Owen Bennett

Owen Bennett is exploring the fundamental essence of caring relationships and the themes of interdependence, reliance, and sacrifice. Care is a concept that has surrounded him and his family since the birth of his younger brother. Oscar was born with severe cerebral palsy and as a result, his family home has been a hub of caring activity ever since. The image subject depicts Oscar with Sian, who has been his carer for almost 10 years now, portraying their connection as well as their physicality. This image posits an introspective mindset within the viewer, questioning their notions of care, giving and receiving, entitlement and love.

Gods of Care

Gods of Care

Owen Bennett

Owen Bennett is exploring the fundamental essence of caring relationships and the themes of interdependence, reliance, and sacrifice. Care is a concept that has surrounded him and his family since the birth of his younger brother. Oscar was born with severe cerebral palsy and as a result, his family home has been a hub of caring activity ever since. The image subject depicts Oscar with Sian, who has been his carer for almost 10 years now, portraying their connection as well as their physicality. This image posits an introspective mindset within the viewer, questioning their notions of care, giving and receiving, entitlement and love.

Gods of Care

INSECURE SINCERITY

Hayley Richardson

INSECURE SINCERITY is an intimate project exploring the experience of existence in inertia. The series of thirty-seven 35mm photographs exemplify how art can provide an outlet and an empowering voice for vulnerability, imperfection, and honesty, by playing with space and representation in a private, personal space: the bedroom. Focussing on the complexity and sincerity of navigating life with a mental illness, my work explores the intersectional connections found between emotion and thought, imagery and text. Self-portrait photography allows me to capture the haunting reality of living with depression in an honest and open manner, and writing allows me to express this reality even further. The blending of these two artistic practises creates a visual world. My visual world. A world I feel immersed in every day- in my own head. The images I create become an independent extension of my psyche and viewpoint. They serve as a therapeutic outlet for myself; this idea has become the basis of many of my projects, so INSECURE SINCERITY is an expansion of this, touching upon similar themes and ideas, but it should be understood as a new, yet haunted, exploration of the stagnant life I have been living for the past few years. Leaving my body and words behind, we are left with my childhood bedroom.

INSECURE SINCERITY

INSECURE SINCERITY

Hayley Richardson

INSECURE SINCERITY is an intimate project exploring the experience of existence in inertia. The series of thirty-seven 35mm photographs exemplify how art can provide an outlet and an empowering voice for vulnerability, imperfection, and honesty, by playing with space and representation in a private, personal space: the bedroom. Focussing on the complexity and sincerity of navigating life with a mental illness, my work explores the intersectional connections found between emotion and thought, imagery and text. Self-portrait photography allows me to capture the haunting reality of living with depression in an honest and open manner, and writing allows me to express this reality even further. The blending of these two artistic practises creates a visual world. My visual world. A world I feel immersed in every day- in my own head. The images I create become an independent extension of my psyche and viewpoint. They serve as a therapeutic outlet for myself; this idea has become the basis of many of my projects, so INSECURE SINCERITY is an expansion of this, touching upon similar themes and ideas, but it should be understood as a new, yet haunted, exploration of the stagnant life I have been living for the past few years. Leaving my body and words behind, we are left with my childhood bedroom.

INSECURE SINCERITY

INSECURE SINCERITY

Hayley Richardson

INSECURE SINCERITY is an intimate project exploring the experience of existence in inertia. The series of thirty-seven 35mm photographs exemplify how art can provide an outlet and an empowering voice for vulnerability, imperfection, and honesty, by playing with space and representation in a private, personal space: the bedroom. Focussing on the complexity and sincerity of navigating life with a mental illness, my work explores the intersectional connections found between emotion and thought, imagery and text. Self-portrait photography allows me to capture the haunting reality of living with depression in an honest and open manner, and writing allows me to express this reality even further. The blending of these two artistic practises creates a visual world. My visual world. A world I feel immersed in every day- in my own head. The images I create become an independent extension of my psyche and viewpoint. They serve as a therapeutic outlet for myself; this idea has become the basis of many of my projects, so INSECURE SINCERITY is an expansion of this, touching upon similar themes and ideas, but it should be understood as a new, yet haunted, exploration of the stagnant life I have been living for the past few years. Leaving my body and words behind, we are left with my childhood bedroom.

INSECURE SINCERITY

Memory Puzzle

Shi Liang Hu

Memory puzzle is a series of collages using archival family photographs taken at the time of the Chinese Cultural revolution. The collages made ask questions about memory, what stories are held back and what stories are told and the affects of this silence on future generations.

Memory Puzzle

Memory Puzzle

Shi Liang Hu

Memory puzzle is a series of collages using archival family photographs taken at the time of the Chinese Cultural revolution. The collages made ask questions about memory, what stories are held back and what stories are told and the affects of this silence on future generations.

Memory Puzzle

Memory Puzzle

Shi Liang Hu

Memory puzzle is a series of collages using archival family photographs taken at the time of the Chinese Cultural revolution. The collages made ask questions about memory, what stories are held back and what stories are told and the affects of this silence on future generations.

Memory Puzzle

Memory Puzzle

Shi Liang Hu

Memory puzzle is a series of collages using archival family photographs taken at the time of the Chinese Cultural revolution. The collages made ask questions about memory, what stories are held back and what stories are told and the affects of this silence on future generations.

Memory Puzzle

House

Troubled Peace

Danielle Anderson

Danielle Anderson is from Northern Ireland and Troubled Peace is an exploration this confusing country. Her visual language aims to assist both her and the viewers' comprehension of this complex experience. Her self-analysis focuses on the process of integration in a country still haunted by its past.

Click here to view the photobook
Troubled Peace

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Twilight of the Unhomely

Fraser Hanley-Nicholls

‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ is the third chapter in my ‘search for identity’. This project addresses the roots of my search by reinterpreting an affidavit – found online in an old parliament document named ‘Papers Relating to the Treatment of Slaves in the Colonies’ (1818) – written by an ancestor living in 17th century Nevis: a ‘free coloured man and house carpenter’ named John Hanley. My reinterpretation aims to tell the story of John Hanley whose inner conflict is ignited as he encounters a mental crossroads at the masquerade – detailed in his affidavit – as it unfolds before him. This masquerade is, in actuality, a ritual that brings John Hanley into contact with his own ancestors and future descendants who interrogate the political meaning of his identity within these dual contexts. John Hanley falters at this interrogation and so is sentenced to bear a curse on the family name, with intergenerational effects burdening them to question their identity indefinitely. ‘Twilight of the Unhomely’ aims to illustrate the psychological effects of the intergenerational oppression of Black people and how this creates a perpetual sequence of inner conflict, or ‘unhomeliness’, when my family has attempted to navigate their identities. Twilight of the Unhomely Poem: Wandering into estates with ghosts on my heels; Bitter lips twist and piercing eyes inject, Sing about us and wring we spine, crack these joints and break our unhomely burden, for we wilt over the flame of neglect. Make space for squashed lungs and give way to a cloud full of ash to glisten on fertile soil. Only then may we elude this eclipse over lineage, and the masquerade of navigation,  to finally preside over this unruly rhizome of family ties. Inspired not only by multiplicity and opacity but the route of our seeds, and where identity might sew its next story.

Twilight of the Unhomely

Sawa Issue #2

Rawanne Koumaira

A video of a publication containing personal stories about the topics of migration linked to identity in the Lebanese community. The publications use documentary photography containing portraits of the subject and photographs from around their home and text from interviews to portray this.

Sawa Issue #1

Rawanne Koumaira

A video of a publication containing personal stories about the topics of migration linked to identity in the Lebanese community. The publications use documentary photography containing portraits of the subject and photographs from around their home and text from interviews to portray this.